99 Marketing Terms Every Founder should know

 Start Up Founder reviewing data with team

The business world is full of acronyms and insider lingo that can leave anyone dazed and confused. It can become even more overwhelming when you realize that things are constantly changing in this day and age. That means there are always new marketing terms that can leave your head spinning.

To get a handle on things, in a hurry, bookmark this handy glossary of 99 marketing terms, and the next time you come across a word or acronym you don’t know, you’ll know exactly where to look to get a clear definition.

Having a thorough understanding of these terms means that you’re staying on top of the latest growth trends and you can quickly break them down to the rest of your team.


 

A

1. A/B Testing

The process of comparing two variations of a single variable to determine which performs best to help improve marketing efforts. A/B testing is most often used in email marketing (with changes in the subject line or body), calls-to-action (variations in colors or copy), and landing pages (variations in the content/color scheme).

2. Analytics

Analytics is the discovery and understanding of meaningful patterns in data. In the context of marketing, it’s looking at the data of an initiative (website visitor reports, social, PPC, etcetera.), analyzing the trends, and developing insights to make better marketing decisions. (Want to learn marketing analytics? Here a list of nine great sources to get you started.)

3. Application Programming Interface (API)

An application program interface (API) is code that allows two software programs to communicate with each other. It's kind of like a phone for applications to have conversations -- an API calls one application and gets information to bring to you to use in your software. APIs facilitate the data needed to provide solutions to customer problems.

B

4. B2B (Business-to-Business)

An adjective used to describe a business model that focuses on selling products and services to other companies. For example, Google and Salesforce are primarily B2B companies.

5. B2C (Business-to-Consumer)

An adjective used to describe a business model that focuses on selling products and services directly to consumers. For example, McDonald's, Amazon, and Nike are primarily B2C companies.

6. Blogging

Blogging is short for weblogging. A blog, whether personal or business will mostly include regular entries of commentary, descriptions of events, or other material, such as photos and video.

Blogging is a core component of inbound marketing, as it can accomplish several goals simultaneously -- like building web traffic, increasing thought leadership, and generating leads.

7. Business Blogging

Business blogging helps marketers drive traffic to their website, convert that traffic into leads, establish authority on specific topics, and drive long-term results. (Learn about these benefits in more detail here.)

When blogging for business, marketers optimize posts with keywords that their target demographic is searching for and provide insightful, resources to these readers. Typically, these blog posts should be actionable (by providing an opt-in, downloadable offer), as to provide a metric for the effectiveness of the business blogging.

8. Bottom of the Funnel

The bottom of the funnel is the “purchase” stage of the online buying process, as a result of responses to web marketing. The top of the funnel (product/service comparison stage) and the middle of the funnel (validation stage) precedes it. The bottom of the funnel occurs after the visitor is done researching and is soon to be a “new customer.” They are close to purchasing (i.e., car buying, home refinance/purchase) and the next step in the process is for the sales rep to contact the “Lead” directly (i.e., free demo, test drive).

9. Bounce Rate

Website bounce rate: a metric that displays the percentage of people who land on your website and leave without clicking to any other pages on your website -- more specifically, single-page visitors. A high bounce rate generally leads to poor conversion rates because no one is staying on your site long enough to read your content or convert on a landing page (or for any other conversion event).

Email bounce rate: refers to the percentage of email addresses in your subscriber list that didn’t receive your message because a recipient mail server returned it. There are two categories of email bounces including hard bounce and soft bounce.

10. Buyer Persona

A buyer persona is a fictionalized characterization of your best customer(s) based on information about them and how they use your product or service. These descriptions mirror your various market segments, with names to match the type of buyer.

C

11. Call-to-Action

In marketing, a call to action (CTA) is an instruction to the audience designed to provoke an immediate response, usually using an imperative verb such as "call now," "find out more" or "visit a store today." Other types of calls-to-action might provide consumers with strong reasons for purchasing immediately such an offer that is only available for a limited time (e.g. 'Offer must expire soon'; 'Limited stocks available') or a special deal usually accompanied by a time constraint (e.g. 'Order before midnight to receive a free gift with your order'; 'Two for the price of one for first 50 callers only').

12. CAN-SPAM

CAN-SPAM stands for "Controlling the Assault of Non-Solicited Pornography and Marketing." It's a U.S. law passed in 2003 that establishes the rules for commercial email and commercial messages; it gives recipients the right to have a business stop emailing them, and outlines the penalties incurred for those who violate the law. For example, CAN-SPAM is the reason businesses are required to have an "unsubscribe" option at the bottom of every email. (Learn more of the details here.)

13. CASL

CASL stands for "Canadian Anti-Spam Legislation." It's a Canadian law passed in 2013 that covers the sending of "commercial electronic messages" that may be accessed by a computer in Canada. CASL covers email, texts, instant messages, and automated cell phone messages sent to computers and phones in Canada. (Learn more of the details here.)

14. Churn Rate

The churn rate is the percentage of subscribers to a service who discontinue their subscriptions to the service within a given time. For a company to expand its clientele, its growth rate, as measured by the number of new customers, must exceed its churn rate. This rate is generally expressed as a percentage. The churn rate is also known as the rate of attrition.

For example, if a company had 500 customers at the beginning of October and only 450 customers at the end of October (discounting any customers that were closed in October), their customer churn rate would be: (500-450)/500 = 50/500 = 10%.

Churn rate is a significant metric primarily for recurring revenue companies. Regardless of your monthly revenue, if your average customer does not stick around long enough for you to at least break even on your customer acquisition costs, you’re in trouble.

15. Clickthrough Rate (CTR)

Click-through rate (CTR) is the percentage of individuals viewing a web page who click on a specific advertisement that appears on the page. Click-through rate measures how successful an ad has been in capturing users' interest. The higher the click-through rate, the more successful the ad has been in generating interest. A high click-through rate can help a website owner support the site through advertising dollars. Because Internet users have become desensitized to ads on web pages, a typical click-through rate is only about two users per 1,000 views (or impressions) or 0.2%.

16. Closed-Loop Marketing

A highly effective method of collecting and analyzing customer data from multiple channels and using the information to create targeted content for groups of customers. It provides a continuous cycle of obtaining customer’s preferences and adjusting the marketing strategy to apply.

When done correctly, you’d be able to see just how much of your marketing investment yielded new business growth. One of the most significant business benefits of implementing an inbound marketing strategy and utilizing ]marketing software is the ability to execute closed-loop marketing.

17. Conversion Path

A conversion path is a series of website-based events that facilitate lead capture. The typical conversion path begins with a user arriving at a landing page and proceeding through a series of page transitions until reaching a final state, either positive (e.g., purchase) or negative (e.g., abandoned session).

18. Content

Concerning inbound marketing, content is a piece of information that exists to be digested (not literally), engaged with, and shared. Content typically comes in the form of a blog, video, social media post, photo, slideshow, or podcast, although there are plenty of over types out there. From website traffic to lead conversion to customer marketing, content plays an indispensable role in a successful inbound marketing strategy.

19. Content Management System (CMS)

A web application designed to make it easy for non-technical users to create, edit, and manage a website. Helps users with content editing and more "behind-the-scenes" work like making content searchable and indexable, automatically generating navigation elements, keeping track of users and permissions, and more.

20. Content Optimization System (COS)

A COS is a CMS (Content Management System) but optimized to deliver customers the most personalized web experience possible.

21. Context

If content is king, then context is queen. Serving up valuable content is essential, but ensuring that it’s customized for the right audience is equally (if not more) important. As buyers become more in control of what information they digest (again, not literally), it’s important to deliver content that’s contextually relevant.

22. Conversion Rate

The percentage of people who completed a desired action on a single web page, such as filling out a form. Pages with high conversion rates are performing well, while pages with low conversion rates are performing poorly.

23. Conversion Rate Optimization (CRO)

In digital marketing, conversion optimization, or conversion rate optimization (CRO) is a system for increasing the percentage of visitors to a website that convert into customers, or more generally, take any desired action on a webpage.

24. Cost-per-Lead (CPL)

The amount it costs your marketing organization to acquire a lead. This factors heavily into CAC (customer acquisition cost) and is a metric marketers should always pay attention too.

25. Crowdsourced Content

Creating your content can take more time than you have to lend to it -- which is where crowdsourcing comes into play. Allowing subject matter experts, customers, or freelancers to create your content for you is a way to get more quality content published in less time. Compile the material you get back into an excellent offer and give credit to all the contributors -- a win-win for everyone involved.

26. Customer Acquisition Cost (CAC)

The cost associated with convincing a customer to buy a product/service. This cost is incurred by the business to convince a potential customer.

27. Customer Relationship Management (CRM)

Software for managing all of your company’s relationships and interactions with customers and potential customers. The goal is simple: Improve business relationships. A CRM system helps companies stay connected to customers, streamline processes, and improve profitability.

28. CSS

CSS stands for Cascading Style Sheets, and it's what gives your entire website its style, like colors, fonts, and background images. It affects the mood and tone of a web page, making it an incredibly powerful tool. It's also what allows websites to adapt to different screen sizes and device types. (Learn more about CSS, HTML, and JavaScript here.)

D

29. Dynamic Content

A way to display different messaging on your website based on the information you already know about the visitor. For example, you could use Smart CTAs so that first-time visitors will see a personalized CTA (perhaps with a top-of-the-funnel offer) and those already in your database see a different CTA (maybe for content that offers a little more information about your product or service).

E

30. Ebook

A book publication made available in digital form, consisting of text, images, or both, readable on the flat-panel display of computers or other electronic devices. Ebooks are a common type of content that many marketers use, often to help generate leads. They are generally a more long-form content type than, say, blog posts, and go into in-depth detail on a subject. Here's an excellent ebook on how to write an ebook (so meta).

31. Editorial Calendar

It's like a road map for content creation, showing you what kind of content to create, what topics to cover, which personas to target, and how often to publish to best support your strategy. Maintaining an editorial calendar will keep you more organized and show you any gaps you may have in your content library. It also helps ensure you're doing the right things for your personas and not going way off-track with the topics you're covering.

32. Email

In its most basic sense, email stands for “Electronic Mail.” It’s a core component of marketing because it’s a direct connection to a contact’s inbox. However, with high power comes great responsibility, meaning it’s important for marketers not to abuse the email relationship with a contact.

33. Engagement Rate

A metric that measures the level of engagement that a piece of created content is receiving from an audience. It shows how much people interact with the content. Factors that influence engagement include users' comments, shares, likes, and more.

34. Evergreen Content

Is content that is always relevant—much like the way evergreen trees retain their leaves all year around. Interesting and relevant content that does not become dated is necessary to be found online by search engines

F

35. Facebook

Facebook is the most popular social networking website that allows registered users to create profiles, upload photos, and video, send messages and keep in touch with friends, family, and colleagues. Brands can now utilize the excellent targeting options available through Facebook advertising to find and attract brand new contacts to their website and get them to convert on landing pages.

36. Form

The place your page visitors will supply information in exchange for your offer. It’s also how those visitors can turn into valuable sales leads. As a best practice, only ask for information you need from your leads to adequately follow up with and qualify them.

37. Friction

Any element of your website that is confusing, distracting, or causes stress for visitors, causing them to leave your page. Examples of friction-causing elements include dissonant colors, too much text, distracting website navigation menus, or landing page forms with too many fields.

G

38. Google+

Google+ (referred to as "Google Plus") is a social network that allows you to join and create circles in which you can mix and match family members, friends, colleagues, and fellow industry members. While you can use it much like other social networks -- to publish and share content, and generate new leads -- it also provides content marketers with tremendous SEO value due to the rising importance of social sharing in search engine algorithms.

H

39. Hashtag

Hashtags are a way for you and your readers to interact with each other on social media and have conversations about a particular piece of content. They tie public conversations on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram together into a single stream, which users can find by searching for a hashtag, clicking on one, or using a third-party monitoring tool.

The hashtags themselves are merely a keyword phrase, spelled out without spaces, with a pound sign (#) in front of it -- like #PushCM and #CookieLovers. You can put these hashtags anywhere in your social media posts.

40. HTML

Is short for HyperText Markup Language, a language used to write web pages. It's at the core of every web page, regardless the complexity of a site or number of technologies involved, and provides the basic structure of the site -- which is then enhanced and modified by other technologies like CSS and JavaScript.

I

41. Inbound Marketing

Inbound marketing is a technique for drawing customers to products and services via content marketing, social media marketing, search engine optimization, and branding.

42. Inbound Link

An inbound link is a link coming from another site to your website. The person receiving the link generally uses "Inbound." For example, here's an inbound link to our co-founder Roger's blog. Roger could say, "I received an inbound link from PCM."

Websites that receive many inbound links can be more likely to rank higher in search engines. They also help folks gain referral traffic from other sites.

43. Infographic

An infographic (information graphic) is a representation of information in a graphic format designed to make the data easily understandable at a glance.

44. Instagram

Though initially a haven only for younger generations who wanted to post, edit, and share unique-looking photos, Instagram has grown into a premier social network that's a viable opportunity for content marketers. Many businesses are taking advantage of the site by posting industry related photos that their followers and customers would enjoy seeing.

J

45. JavaScript

JavaScript is a programming language commonly used in web development. Netscape originally developed it as a means to add dynamic and interactive elements to websites. ... Like server-side scripting languages, such as PHP and ASP, JavaScript code can be inserted anywhere within the HTML of a webpage.

K

46. Key Performance Indicator (KPI)

A Key Performance Indicator (KPI) is a measurable value that demonstrates how effectively a company is achieving key business objectives. Organizations use key performance indicators at multiple levels to evaluate their success in reaching targets

47. Keyword

Sometimes referred to as "keyword phrases," keywords are the topics that web pages get indexed for in search results by engines like Google, Yahoo, and Bing.

L

48. Landing Page

A landing page is a website page containing a form that is used for lead generation. This page revolves around a marketing offer, such as an ebook or a webinar, and serves to capture visitor information in exchange for the valuable offer. Landing pages are the gatekeepers of the conversion path and are what separates a website visitor from becoming a lead.

A smart inbound marketer will create landing pages that appeal to different personae (plural for persona) at various stages of the buying process. A hefty endeavor no doubt, but one that pays off in spades.

49. Lead

A person or company who's shown interest in a product or service in some way, shape, or form. Perhaps they filled out a form, subscribed to a blog, or shared their contact information in exchange for a coupon.

Generating leads is a critical part of a prospect's journey to becoming a customer, and it falls in between the second and third stages of the larger inbound marketing methodology, which you can see below.

Landing pages, forms, offers, and calls-to-action are just a few tools to help companies generate leads.

50. Lead Nurturing

Sometimes referred to as “drip marketing,” lead nurturing is the practice of developing a series of communications (emails & social media messages) that seek to qualify a lead, keep it engaged, and gradually push it down the sales funnel. Inbound marketing is all about delivering valuable content to the right audience -- and lead nurturing helps foster this by providing contextually relevant information to a lead during different stages of the buying lifecycle.

51. LinkedIn

LinkedIn is a business-oriented social networking site. It launched in 2003 and is mainly used for professional networking. Nowadays, with more than 414 million registered members, LinkedIn is the most popular social network for professionals and one of the top social networks overall.

52. Lifecycle Stages

These divisions serve as a way to describe the relationship you have with your audience, and can generally be broken down into three stages: awareness, evaluation, and purchase.

What's important to understand about each of these stages is that not every piece of content you create is appropriate, depending on what stage your audience might fall in at that moment.

53. Lifetime Value (LTV)

An estimate of the average revenue that a customer will generate throughout their lifespan as a customer. This ‘worth’ of a customer can help determine many economic decisions for a company including marketing budget, resources, profitability and forecasting. It is a crucial metric in subscription-based business models, along with MRR (Monthly Recurring Revenue).

54. Long-Tail Keyword

A long-tail keyword is a very targeted search phrase that contains three or more words. It often includes a head term, which is a more generic search term, plus one or two additional words that refine the search term. For example:

Head term: unicorn

Long-tail keywords: unicorn games online, unicorn costumes for kids, unicorn videos on YouTube

Long-tail keywords are more specific, which means visitors that land on your website from a long-tail search term is more qualified, and consequently, more likely to convert.

55. LTV: CAC

The ratio of lifetime value (LTV) to customer acquisition cost (CAC). Once you have the LTV and the CAC, compute the ratio of the two. If it costs you $100,000 to acquire a customer with an LTV of $437,500, then your LTV: CAC is 4.4 to 1.

M

56. Marketing Automation

Marketing automation (MA) is a term used to describe the replacement of repetitive manual marketing processes and tasks with solutions that are automated, especially in regards to e-mail marketing.

Marketing automation nurtures sales prospects with personalized content that is designed to convert them into customers through drip campaigns and nurture campaigns that help educate prospects about your products.

57. Microsite

A microsite is a branded content site that lives outside of the company homepage or brand URL. Microsites are used when marketers want to create a different online experience for their audience separate from their main website. These sites often have their own domain names and distinct visual branding.

58. Middle of the Funnel

Refers to the stage that a lead enters after identifying a problem. Now they’re looking to conduct further research to find a solution to the problem. Typical middle of the funnel offers include case studies or product brochures -- virtually anything that brings your business into the equation as a solution to the problem the lead is looking to solve. Also, if you want to be cool, you can refer to this stage as “MOFU” for short.

59. Mobile Marketing

Mobile marketing is a promotional activity designed for delivery to cell phones, and other handheld devices, usually as a component of a multi-channel campaign.

60. Mobile Optimization

Mobile optimization means designing and formatting your website so that it’s easy to read and navigate from a mobile device. This can be done by either creating a separate mobile website or incorporating responsive design in the initial site layout. Google's algorithm now rewards mobile-friendly websites, so if your site isn't fully optimized for mobile devices, you will likely see a hit to your ranking on mobile searches.

61. Monthly Recurring Revenue (MRR)

The amount of revenue a subscription-based business receives per month. Includes MRR gained by new accounts (net new), MRR gained from upsells (net positive), MRR lost from downsells (net negative), and MRR lost from cancellations (net loss).

N

62. Native Advertising

Native advertising is the use of paid ads that match the look, feel and function of the media format in which they appear. Native ads are often found in social media feeds, or as recommended content on a web page.

Native advertising can come in many forms, whether it's radio announcers talking favorably about a product sponsoring the show, or an article about a product or company showing up in your news source.

63. Net Promoter Score (NPS)

A customer satisfaction metric that measures, on a scale of 0-10, the degree to which people would recommend your company to others. The NPS is derived from a simple survey designed to help you determine how loyal your customers are to your business.

To calculate NPS, subtract the percentage of customers who would not recommend you (detractors, or 0-6) from the percent of customers who would (promoters, or 9-10).

Regularly determining your company’s NPS allows you to identify ways to improve your products and services so you can increase the loyalty of your customers.

64. News Feed

A news feed is an online feed full of news sources. On Facebook, the News Feed is the homepage of users' accounts where they can see all the latest updates from their friends. The news feed on Twitter is called Timeline.

65. No-Follow Link

A no-follow link is used when a website does not want to pass search engine authority to another webpage. It tells search engine crawlers not to follow or give credit to linked sites as a way to avoid association with spammy content or inadvertently violating webmaster guidelines. To varying degrees, the no-follow attribute is recognized by all major search engines, like Google, Yahoo, and Bing. Not all links (and linking domains) are created equal, and a no-follow attribute helps avoid any foul play.

O

66. Offer

Offers are content assets that live behind a form on a landing page. Their primary purpose is to help marketers generate leads for your business. There are many different types of offers you could create, including ebooks, checklists, cheat sheets, webinars, demos, templates, and tools.

67. On-Page Optimization

This type of SEO is based solely on a webpage and the various elements within the HTML. Ensuring that critical pieces of the specific page (content, title tag, URL, and image tags) include the desired keyword will help a page rank for that particular phrase.

68. Off-Page Optimization

Off-page SEO refers to incoming links and other outside factors that impact how a webpage is indexed in search results. Factors like linking domains and even social media play a role in off-page optimization. The good news is that it’s powerful; the not so good news is that it’s mostly out of an inbound marketer’s control. The solution? Create useful, remarkable content and chances are people will share and link to it.

P

69. Page View

A request to load a single web page on the internet. Marketers use them to analyze their website and to see if any change on the webpage results in more or fewer page views.

70. Pay-per-Click (PPC)

PPC stands for pay-per-click, a model of digital marketing in which advertisers pay a fee each time one of their ads is clicked. Mostly, it's a way of buying visits to your site, rather than attempting to “earn” those visits organically.

PPC ads are used to direct traffic to the advertiser's website, and PPC is used to assess the cost-effectiveness and profitability of your paid advertising campaigns.

There are two ways to pay for PPC ads:

Flat rate: where the advertiser and publisher agree on a fixed amount that will be paid for each click. Typically this happens when publishers have a fixed price for PPC in different areas on their website.

Bid-based: where the advertiser competes against other advertisers in an advertising network. In this case, each advertiser sets a maximum spend to pay for a given ad spot, so the ad will stop appearing on a given website once that amount of money is spent. It also means that the more people that click on your ad, the lower PPC you'll pay and vice versa.

71. Personalization

Personalization refers to addressing individual recipients by their first name, last name or both dynamically in an email. Personalization can also include a reference to previous purchases, or other content unique to each recipient.

72. Pinterest

Pinterest is a visual social network typically used by e-commerce marketers, but not without its fair share of top-notch B2B and B2C content marketers. Businesses and consumers alike use the website to post images and photos they like so fellow users can repin (share) that content.

Not every company has taken advantage of this site yet. If you're one of them, we advise you check out this free guide to Pinterest for business.)

Q

73. Qualified Lead

A qualified marketing lead is a prospect already in your lead-tracking system, who has expressed interest in buying your product and passes a set of lead qualifications to progress further down the funnel.

74. QR Code

A machine-readable code consisting of an array of black and white squares, typically used for storing URLs or other information for reading by the camera on a smartphone.

R

75. Responsive Design

Responsive design is an approach to web page creation that makes use of flexible layouts, flexible images, and cascading style sheet media queries. The goal of responsive design is to build web pages that detect the visitor's screen size and orientation and change the layout accordingly.

76. Return on Investment (ROI)

Return on investment (ROI) measures the gain or loss generated on an investment relative to the amount of money invested. ROI is usually expressed as a percentage and is typically used for personal financial decisions, to compare a company's profitability or to compare the efficiency of different investments.

77. Retweet

A re-posting of a tweet posted by another user on Twitter. Retweets look like regular tweets except for the retweet icon. They can be done in three ways:

1) You can retweet an entire tweet by clicking the retweet button.

2) You can post a new tweet that includes your commentary. In a new tweet, which also features the original tweet. It means you've pressed the rotating arrow icon to retweet a post, and then added a comment in the text box provided. We prefer this method of retweeting because it allows you to add your thoughts. (Note: The retweet takes up 24 characters, leaving you with 116 characters for the comment.)

3) You can post a new tweet that includes your commentary in addition to the information you're retweeting. The formula is this: Your commentary + RT + the original tweeter's Twitter handle + colon + the exact text from their original tweet. This method of retweeting allows you to add your thoughts, but with a minimal character count.

When you see "Please RT" in someone's tweet, it means they are requesting that their followers retweet that tweet to spread awareness.

S

78. Search Engine Optimization (SEO)

The practice of enhancing where a webpage appears in search results. By adjusting a webpage's on-page SEO elements and influencing off-page SEO factors, an inbound marketer can improve where a webpage appears in search engine results.

There are a ton of components to improving the SEO of your site pages. Search engines look for elements including title tags, keywords, image tags, internal link structure, and inbound links to name a few. Search engines also look at site structure and design, visitor behavior, and other external, off-site factors to determine how highly ranked your site should be in the search engine results pages.

79. Sender Score

An email marketing term that refers to a reputation rating from 0-100 for every outgoing mail server IP address. Mail servers will check your Sender Score before deciding what to do with your emails. A score of over 90 is good.

80. Service Level Agreement (SLA)

For marketers, an SLA is an agreement between a company's sales and marketing teams that defines the expectations Sales has for Marketing and vice versa. The Marketing SLA defines expectations Sales has for Marketing with regards to lead quantity and lead quality, while the Sales SLA defines the expectations Marketing has for Sales on how deeply and frequently Sales will pursue each qualified lead.

SLAs exist to align sales and marketing. If the two departments are managed as separate silos, the system fails. For companies to achieve growth and become leaders in their industries, it is critical that these two groups be adequately integrated.

81. Small-to-Medium Business (SMB)

Usually defined as companies that have between 10 and 500 employees.

82. Smarketing

Is the process of integrating the sales and marketing processes of a business. The objective is for the sales and marketing functions to have a common integrated approach.

83. Snapchat

A social app that allows users to send and receive time-sensitive photos and videos known as "snaps," which are hidden from the recipients once the time limit expires. (Note: Images and videos remain on the Snapchat server). Users can add text and drawings to their snaps and control the list of recipients in which they send them to.

A Snapchat story is a string of Snapchats that lasts for 24 hours. Users can create stories to be shared with all Snapchatters or just a customized group of recipients.

84. Social Media

Social media is media designed to be disseminated through social interaction, created using highly accessible and scalable publishing techniques. Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, LinkedIn, and Google+ are examples of social media networks that one can join for personal or business use. Social Media is a core component of Inbound, as it provides marketers with additional channels to spread reach, increase growth, and reach business goals.

85. Social Proof

Social proof refers to a psychological phenomenon in which people seek direction from those around them to determine how they are supposed to act or think in a given situation. It's like when you see a long line outside a nightclub and assume that club is outstanding because it's in such high demand. In social media, social proof can be identified by the number of interactions a piece of content receives or the number of followers you have. The idea is that if others are sharing something or following someone, it must be good.

86. Software-as-a-Service (SaaS)

Software as a service (SaaS) is a software distribution model in which a third-party provider hosts applications and makes them available to customers over the Internet. SaaS is one of three main categories of cloud computing, alongside infrastructure as a service (IaaS) and platform as a service (PaaS).

T

87. Top of the Funnel

Sometimes called “TOFU,” top of the funnel refers to the very first stage of the buying process. Leads at this stage are just identifying a problem that they have and are looking for more information. As such, an inbound marketer will want to create helpful content that aids leads in identifying this problem and providing next steps toward a solution.

88. Twitter

For the sake of creativity, I’ll define Twitter in 140 characters or less: "Twitter is a platform that allows users to share 140-character long messages publicly. Users can follow one another and be followed back." There you have it -- a tweetable definition of Twitter.

U

89. Unique Visitor

Unique visitor is a term used in Web analytics to refer to a person who visits a site at least once within the reporting period. Each visitor to the site is only counted once during the reporting period, so if the same IP address accesses the site the site many times, it still only counts as one visitor.

90. URL

Short for Uniform Resource Locator, this is the address of a piece of information that can be found on the web such as a page, image, or document (ex. http://www.pushcm.com). URLs are important for on-page SEO, as search engines scour the included text when mining for keywords. If a keyword you’re looking to get indexed for is in the URL, you’ll get rewarded by search engines.

91. User Experience (UX)

The overall experience a customer has with a particular business, from their discovery and awareness of the brand all the way through their interaction, purchase, use, and even advocacy of that brand. To deliver an excellent customer experience, you have to think like a customer, or better, think about being the customer. Learn more here.

92. User Interface (UI)

A type of interface that allows users to control a software application or hardware device. A good user interface provides a user-friendly experience by enabling the user to interact with the software or hardware intuitively. It includes a menu bar, toolbar, windows, buttons, and so on. Learn how to create a user-friendly website registration process here.

V

93. Viral Content

This term is used to describe a piece of content that has become wildly popular across the web through sharing. Frequently, people don’t know a piece they’re creating will go viral until it does, which is usually unfortunate if it’s particularly embarrassing.

W

94. Website

A website is a set of interconnected web pages, usually including a homepage, generally located on the same server, and prepared and maintained as a collection of information by a person, group, or organization. An inbound marketer should structure a website like a dynamic, multi-dimensional entity that can be used to attract relevant website visitors, convert those visitors into leads, and close those leads into customers. Otherwise, it’s just a brochure -- and let’s be honest -- could you use another brochure?

95. Word-of-Mouth (WOM)

Word-of-mouth marketing (WOMM, WOM marketing), also called word of mouth advertising, differs from naturally occurring word of mouth, in that it is actively influenced or encouraged by companies. WOM marketing is inexpensive, but it takes work and involves leveraging many components of inbound marketing like product marketing, content marketing, and social media marketing. (Learn more about creating a powerful WOM marketing strategy here.)

96. Workflow

Workflow is another way to describe a lead nurturing campaign. It’s a set of triggers and events that move a lead through the nurturing process. A workflow can also serve other purposes, such as adjust contact properties on a lead record based on certain conditions, or adding a contact record to a particular list. Regardless of how you use it, workflows can be a potent asset in an inbound marketing strategy.

X

97. XML Sitemap

We couldn’t leave “X” out of the party! An XML sitemap is a file of code that lives on your web server and lists all of the relevant URLs that are in the structure of your website. It's kind of like a "floor plan" for the site, which especially comes in handy whenever the site gets changed. It also helps search engine web crawlers determine the structure of the site so they can crawl it more intelligently.

Sitemaps don't guarantee all links will be crawled, and being crawled does not ensure indexing. However, a sitemap is still the best insurance for getting a search engine to learn about your entire site. It’s sort of like saying “Hey, Google -- check out this fine website.”

Y

98. YouTube

YouTube is a video-sharing website on which users can upload, share, and view videos. Three former PayPal employees created YouTube in February 2005. In November 2006, YouTube, LLC was bought by Google Inc. for $1.65 billion and is now operated as a subsidiary of Google. YouTube is the largest video-sharing site in the world, and you’re probably on it now instead of finishing up this post.

Z

99. Zero

Exactly how much we are charging you for this glossary.


 
 

Rebecca Stewart | Brand Strategist

I specialize in growth marketing for PCM by optimizing social media, digital advertising, branding, and content creation for e-commerce and small business clients. I would love to hear about your brand or business that would benefit from fun, creative and most importantly effective growth strategy